Some of the following books are long term classics, others more modern thoughts on how investing works in today’s world. We love all of them but figured you shouldn’t just take our word for it. 


intelligent investor

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  1. The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham – “By far the best book on investing ever written.” – Warren Buffett.
  2. Stocks for The Long Run by Jeremy Siegel – “[Jeremy Siegel’s] contributions to finance and investing are of such significance as to change the direction of the profession.” – The Financial Analyst Institute.
  3. Market Wizards by Jack Schwager – “Market Wizards is one of the most fascinating books ever written about Wall Street. A few of the “Wizards” are my friends—and Jack Schwager has nailed their modus operandi on the head.” – Martin W. Zweig, Ph.D., Editor The Zweig Forecast.
  4. The Four Pillars of Investing by William Bernstein – “[Bernstein’s] essential message is…’Buy the market, keep your costs down….’ But the evidence…is extensive and…convincing…” – Barron’s, May 2002.
  5. The Warren Buffett Way by Robert Hagstrom – “A comprehensive primer on applying Buffett’s investment strategy to the new economy.” – Fortune.
  6. One Up On Wall Street by Peter Lynch – “Mr. Lynch’s investment record puts him in a league by himself.” – Anise C. Wallace The New York Times
  7. A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel – “Not more than half a dozen really good books about investing have been written in the past fifty years. This one may well belong in the classics category.” – Forbes.
  8. Irrational Exuberance by Robert Shiller – “A superb, well-written, well-argued contribution for serious scholars and practitioners, whether they agree with Shiller or not.” – Choice.
  9. Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes and How To Correct Them by Gary Belsky & Thomas Gilovich – “This very helpful book is aimed at the novice and the expert, and you come away from it somewhat chastened by your own financial mistakes, but hopeful that you might learn a thing or two about holding onto your hard-earned cash. The authors don’t offer simplistic solutions, but hard facts and sound advice.” -Robert J. Hughes, SmartMoney.
  10. The Money Game by Adam Smith – “The best book there is about the stock market and all that goes with it.” – The New York Times Book Review.
  11. Against The Gods: The Remarkable Story of Risk by Peter Bernstein – “Ambitious and readable . . . an engaging introduction to the oddsmakers, whom Bernstein regards as true humanists helping to release mankind from the choke holds of superstition and fatalism.” – The New York Times.
  12. Common Sense on Mutual Funds by John Bogle – “Common Sense on Mutual Funds,” by John Bogle, inventor of the retail index fund and founder of the Vanguard Group. It’s the best book ever on fund investing, just updated for new investors. The case for indexing is rock solid, as you’ll see here. It’s the only strategy that works, long term.”- Jane’s Book Club.
  13. How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff – “A great introduction to the use of statistics, and a great refresher for anyone who’s already well-versed in it.” – Bill Gates.
  14. Manias, Panics and Crashes by Charles Kindleberger – “The turmoil of 2007-8 reminded us only too painfully that financial crises are not confined to distant times and places. This latest edition of Charlie Kindleberger’s classic study of man’s serial financial follies, updated by Robert Aliber, brings the story right up to the present. A fount of wisdom not only for students of finance and economics, but also for central bankers and financial market practitioners.” Professor Sir Charles Bean, The London School of Economics, UK.
  15. A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel – “A Random Walk has set thousands of investors on a straight path…. A lucid mix of the theoretical and the pragmatic.” – Chicago Tribune.